HEART SCAN

Heart Scan Only $59

A heart scan is the fastest, easiest and most accurate way to learn about your heart’s state of health. In the United States, heart disease is the number one cause of death and, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, it is estimated that an American has a coronary event approximately every 25 seconds.

Utilizing the state-of-the-art GE Optima CT, Advanced Body Scan’s heart scans can detect early signs of coronary artery disease. W le, traditional diagnostic imagining will reveal large deposits, the new GE Optima CT can show even tiny deposits due to its extremely rapid scanner that eliminates motion blur and allows for a more accurate picture.

In conjunction with the specialists at General Electric, the medical staff at Advanced Body Scan has recently created the most advanced and comprehensive CT protocol for the early detection.

Purchase your $59 Heart Scan Online Here.

Take charge of your heart health!

With the information gathered from your heart scan, you and your doctor can design an individualized plan of action. Early detection, coupled with this individualized, proactive approach, can help prevent future cardiac events.

Talk to Advanced Body Scan about preventive imaging technology and the benefits it will provide for you.

For more information, contact us today. You owe it to yourself and your family to make the call (405) 242-1400.

What Can A Heart Scan Detect?

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Heart Attack

More than a million Americans have heart attacks each year. In fact, an American suffers from a heart attack every 25 seconds.

What is a Heart Attack

The heart muscle requires a constant supply of oxygen –rich blood and the coronary arteries provide the heart with this critical blood.

However, if you have coronary artery disease, those arteries become narrow and blood cannot flow as well as it should causing calcium to build up within the arteries and form plaque.

Blood clots form around the plaque and block the artery depriving the heart muscle of oxygen. Within a short time, death of heart muscle cells occurs resulting in permanent damage to the heart muscle; a heart attack.

Risk factors for Heart Attacks:

  • Family History
  • Smoking
  • High Cholesterol
  • Stress
  • Physical Inactivity
  • Obesity
  • Diabetes
  • High Blood Pressure

Symptoms of a Heart Attack

Signs can vary person to person, however the five major symptoms of a heart attack are:

  • Pain or discomfort in the jaw, neck or back
  • Feeling weak, light-headed or faint
  • Fatigue
  • Pain or discomfort in arms or shoulder
  • Shortness of breath
  • Chest pain or discomfort

Heart disease is a progressive disease, therefore if you are having a heart attack, the trouble has been building up in your chest for a while. It is important not to wait, therefore you need to know if you are at risk prior to an event.

If you have a heart attack, you are more likely to survive if you know the signs and symptoms, call 911 right away and get to a hospital quickly.

How do you minimize your risk?

People who have had a heart attack can reduce the risk of future events or strokes by making lifestyle changes and taking medication.

Prevention includes:

  • Quit smoking, avoid second hand smoke
  • Lower cholesterol
  • Control high blood pressure
  • Maintain a healthy weight
  • Exercise
  • In some cases, surgery is necessary
  • Get a heart scan on a regular basis

The GE Optima CT heart scan at Advanced Body Scan is the single most effective technology available to simply and non-invasively detect the warning signs of a heart attack.

Other diagnostic procedures generally only capture signs of the disease once you are experiencing 50 to 75 percent arterial blockage. Even if you recently had a normal stress test, MRI, CT scan or PET scan, if you fall into a high-risk category you should consider having a heart scan.

Coronary Artery Disease

Coronary artery disease, also referred to as heart disease or coronary atherosclerosis, is the most common type of heart disease and is the leading cause of death in the U.S. for both men and women.

What is Coronary Artery Disease

Coronary Artery occurs when the arteries that supply blood to the heart muscle become hardened and narrowed. This is due to the buildup of cholesterol and other material (plaque) on the inner walls.

As it grows, less blood can flow through the arteries resulting in the heart muscle being deprived of the blood or oxygen it needs.

This can lead to chest pain (angina) or a heart attack. Over time this can also contribute to heart failure and arrhythmias (changes in the normal beating rhythm of the heart).

Symptoms of Coronary Artery Disease

Signs and severity can vary person to person. The most common signs are:

  • Chest pain or discomfort
  • Pressure or squeezing in your chest, sometimes shoulders, arms, neck, jaw, or back
  • Fatigue
  • Indigestion
  • Pain worsens with activity and goes away with rest
  • Shortness of breath

How do you minimize your risk?

  • Quit smoking. Avoid second-hand smoke
  • Exercise
  • Eat a healthy diet
  • Stay at a healthy weight
  • Get a heart scan on a regular basis

The GE Optima CT heart scan at Advanced Body Scan is the single most effective technology available to simply and non-invasively detect the buildup of these calcium deposits.

Other diagnostic procedures generally only capture signs of the disease once you are experiencing 50 to 75 percent arterial blockage. Even if you recently had a normal stress test, MRI, CT scan or PET scan, if you fall into a high-risk category you should consider having a heart scan.

Stroke

Stroke is a disease that affects the arteries leading to and within the brain. It is the number 5 cause of death and leading preventable cause of disability in the U.S. Nearly 800,000 people in the U.S. have a stroke every year and nearly 130,000 of these are fatal.

What is a Stroke

A stroke occurs when a blood vessel that carries oxygen and nutrients to the brain is either blocked by a clot or bursts/ruptures. When that happens, part of the brain cannot get the blood and oxygen it needs, so it and brain cells die.

This can be detected by viewing the arteries around the heart. If these arteries become blocked with calcified plaque, the chances are high that one could detach and block a vessel connected to the brain, resulting in a stroke.

Symptoms of a Stroke

Signs and severity can vary person to person. F.A.S.T. is the recommended acronym from the American Stroke Associate to remember the symptoms:

  • Face drooping – Does one side of the face droop or is it numb? Ask the person to smile, is it uneven or lopsided?
  • Arm weakness – Is one arm weak or numb? Ask the person to raise both arms, does one drift downwards?
  • Speech difficulty – Is speech slurred? Is the person unable to speak or hard to understand? Ask the person to repeat a simple sentence. Is the person able to correctly repeat?
  • Time to call 911 – If someone shows any of these symptoms, even if they go away, call 911 and get them to a hospital immediately. Note the time when the first symptoms appeared.

Other symptoms:

  • Fatigue
  • Sudden confusion, trouble speaking or understanding speech
  • Sudden numbness or weakness of face, arm, or leg, especially on one side of the body
  • Sudden trouble seeing in one or both eyes
  • Sudden trouble walking, dizziness, or loss of balance/coordination
  • Sudden severe headache with no known cause

How do you minimize your risk?

  • Prevent or control high blood pressure
  • Be physically active
  • Control blood sugar
  • Eat healthy
  • Lose weight
  • Manage cholesterol
  • Get quality sleep
  • Stop smoking

The GE Optima CT heart scan at Advanced Body Scan is the single most effective technology available to simply and non-invasively detect the buildup of these calcium deposits before they cause a stroke.

Other diagnostic procedures generally only capture signs of the disease once you are experiencing 50 to 75 percent arterial blockage. Even if you recently had a normal stress test, MRI, CT scan or PET scan, if you fall into a high-risk category you should consider having a heart scan.

Other Assessments

  • Pericardium Assessment
  • Heart Size Assessment
  • Heart Valve Calcification